Doenjang jjigae (된장찌개)

 

 

I decided to make doenjang-jjigae (Soy Bean Paste Stew) after a week of thinking. I don’t hate it! It’s just because I have never tried it before. I’ve ordered Kimchi-jjigae, Yukgaejang and Budae-jjigae, but not doenjang-jjigae.

And as usual, the recipe is from Maangchi: http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/doenjang-jjigae

The minor changes I made: Instead of making anchovy and kelp stock as written in her recipe, I used pork ribs in place of that. I believe using chicken stock will be fine as well.

It is, I wouldn’t say similar, something like Miso Soup. Doenjang-jjigae is not as salty as Miso, considering that I used 5-6 tablespoons of soy bean paste in this stew. And the longer you boil the stew, the more intense the flavour!

Give it a try!

Kimchi Chigae

I was looking back at some of my recipes and I realized that this one deserves a better photo than the previous one! So here’s an update on my version of kimchi chigae a.k.a. kimchi stew, adapted from Maangchi.

Kimchi Stew is a warm, spicy and a bubbling pot of kimchi goodness. It comes with a great combination of meat and vegetables so you can guarantee that it’s pretty healthy, although I wouldn’t recommend it eating everyday! It is absolutely normal to perspire profusely while eating this dish because that’s how it is!

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As mentioned earlier, the recipe is an adaptation from Maangchi’s recipe and it is not at all difficult to follow.

*Just a word of caution, the ingredients might be a deviation from the ‘proper’ kimchi stew.

Ingredients:

  • 500-600g of pork belly
  • 4-5 stalks of spring onions
  • 2 medium-sized onions, roughly chopped
  • 4 heap tablespoons of kimchi
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 2 teaspoons of sugar
  • 2 teaspoons of sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon of hot pepper paste (gochujang)
  • 2 tablespoons, or more, hot pepper flakes (gochugaru)
  • 1 packet of enoki mushrooms

How?

  • Prepare and clean the ingredients beforehand, that includes the stock.
  • For my version of kimchi stew, I used a hotpot as it maintains the temperature.
  • Arrange the ingredients in the hotpot in ANY way you like – plus points if you make it look photogenic.
  • Pour the stock in and let it bubble away slowly.

Maangchi’s recipe calls for an anchovy stock to be made but I used a pork-based one, which is also very easy to make. It’s just 500g of pork ribs into a pot of boiling water and let it boil on high heat for about 10-15 minute before bringing it down to a simmer.

Like what Marco Pierre White said, “Cooking is a philosophy..” So do not be dictated by what the recipe says. If you want to make it spicier, add more red pepper powder. Cooking this dish in a hotpot makes it easier for everyone to share and it sort of becomes like a steamboat-style kimchi stew!

Porky goodness

The original plan was to prepare bo-ssam, or usually translated as boiled pork wraps. It’s a traditional Korean recipe, with boiled pork, hot red spicy oyster radish, and subtly flavored fermented shrimp wrapped in a crispy pickled cabbage leaf (Maangchi). So, it’s essentially a pouch of spicy, sour, salty, porky and kimchi goodness! However, due to the lack of time, I settled with just making the boiled pork! The recipe is taken from http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/bo-ssam and it is very easy to follow as well!

A few things that I left out:

Doenjang (Korean fermented soy bean paste) – Because there was no more stock at the Korean supermarket! 😭

– In place of Doenjang, I added some soy sauce instead.

Hazelnut coffee powder

– I added instant coffee (I used Nescafé, but any instant coffee would be okay I think.)

So give it a try! I guarantee that it’ll be a good experience!